The Hebrew university homepage. Neuropsychiatry lab site Header

Our Group
We are a group of neuroscientists, clinicians and computer scientists interested in exploring the (human) experiencing-self and its relations to the surrounding environment: the space around us, the events that make up our life and future plans, the people we encounter along the way and the concepts we develop throughout. We explore the psychological, computational and neural mechanisms supporting these relations and their role in neuropsychiatric disorders, with specific focus on Alzheimer’s disease.

Our Approach
Our interdisciplinary approach is influenced by psychological theories, geometrical thinking and clinical observations, translated into meticulously designed neuropsychological and functional neuroimaging experiments. We endeavor to conduct ecologically valid studies in both the real and virtual worlds and apply machine-learning tools to derive meaningful and valid conclusions.

Our Goal
We hope to generate novel theoretical, computational and neural understandings of the mechanisms involved in these orientation processes as well as design useful tools to help people and patients orient and re-orient themselves in our dynamic world.

Orientation disorder in Alzheimers disease and mild cognitive impairment transient connectivity disturbances in transient global amnesia
Discontinuity of cortical gradients reflects sensory impairment transient connectivity disturbances in transient global amnesia

Selected publications:


Peer et al., Reversible functional connectivity disturbances during transient global amnesia. Annals of Neurology 2014. link

Peer et al., Brain system for mental orientation in space, time and person. PNAS 2015. link

Saadon-Grosman et al., Discontinuity of cortical gradients reflects sensory impairment. PNAS 2015. link

Arzy S, Idel M. Kabbalah: A Neurocognitive Approach to Mystical Experiences. Yale University Press 2015. link





Want to participate in experiments? Contact us!


All Rights Reserved Copyright © The Hebrew University of Jerusalem.